Reinforcement Perspectives on Motivation

Management in Life

Last week, Charles’s daughter, Dina, was a very bad girl. Dina went to the store with him and whined, “I want this! I want that!” Charles thought it would never stop, and it upset him very much. Charles knows that according to reinforcement theory, two methods can decrease the likelihood of whining in the future: punishment and extinction. Now he’s asking your advice about exactly what to do to use each technique.

If Charles wants to use an extinction technique to get Dina to stop whining, which of the following should Charles do?

 

Put Dina in time-out for whining.

Pay no attention to Dina.

Reward Dina for not whining.

Stop nagging Dina.

On the other hand, if Charles wants to use a punishment technique to stop the whining, which of the following should Charles do?

 

Stop nagging Dina.

Pay no attention to Dina.

Put Dina in time-out for whining.

Reward Dina for not whining.

Your roommate, Patty, has not washed her dishes for several weeks, and it’s driving you crazy. Today, you saw Patty put a spoon into the dishwasher, so you smiled at her and offered to cook dinner tonight. In this case, your expression and offer to cook serve as    for Patty’s behavior.

Which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply.

 

When people are rewarded for behavior, the satisfaction they get from doing the work increases.

Offering people regular reinforcement for desired behaviors at work guarantees increased long-term productivity.

Non-financial incentives are just as effective as financial incentives in changing behavior.

Taking away something negative can act as a positive reinforcer